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September 2010 Posts

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Blog Entry

EVcast #394: EPA, MPG, OMG!

posted by Bo Bennett, Group AdministratorWednesday, September 1st 2010 @ 11:30 AM (not yet rated)    post viewed 6437 times

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[45:08] Join Bo and Ryan for a look at this week's EV news.

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Comments

Paul Cummings
Free Access
PaulCummings said on Wednesday, September 1st 2010 @ 4:14 PM:

What an agreeable show today, guys!

 

I agree whole-heartedly with John’s comments, which dovetails nicely with Shannon’s article about the cost of the Volt and Leaf.  And John is right- you don’t compare the Leaf or the Volt with a stripped down Corolla, but with what most folks actually spend and buy- $28,000 on average:

 

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/autos/aut11.shtm

 

I have to agree with y’all about EREVs as well- ideally, I would like one of each, an EREV like the Volt and a BEV like the Leaf- but if I could only have one car, at this point, it would be an EREV.  Unfortunately, I think we are a ways from having a fast-charge infrastructure and a battery whose chemistry can handle fast-charging without degrading it’s longevity.

 

Thanks for the show, guys!

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Peter
guest
a guest said on Thursday, September 2nd 2010 @ 4:50 AM:

Thanks for the podcast.. but no mention of Nissan opening up the orders for the LEAF? I was lucky enough to put my order in and I should be able to pickup my SV red LEAF in December. I even got it for under the MSRP. I was hoping you would have some numbers on how the orders are going and maybe some reaction to the great news that the super cool LEAF is going into production in September I believe. Anyways... that's all I had to say. I look forward to the next update. Thanks.

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John Briggs
Free Access
JohnBriggs said on Thursday, September 2nd 2010 @ 8:25 AM:

On the EPA stickers.

1) Cost, At least on one sticker it is present and represented an $2.80/gallon and $0.12/KWH based on national averages for year 2010.  I am sure the next year the prices will be adjusted.  This is only standing EPA policy for EPA Energy Star labeling.
     For better for worse, dollars is something consumers can relate to.  Unfortunately, the label could be misleading if you live in part of the country with $0.06/KWH or $0.32/KWH electricity.  But perhaps this is the best that can be done.

2) KWH/100 miles.  This seemed to be on the EV sticker (which I like) but not on the E-REV sticker (which I don't like).

3) Letter grade.  I suspect it would be a sliding scale updated periodically like the Energy Star sticker.  Energy Star is supposed to represent the top 25% of a product group.  This makes it a moving target as it can change yearly.  It has been very successful at creating continuous improvement in things like refrigerators.

 

 

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